20 What Hiring Mistakes Should I Avoid?

Learn From My Hiring Mistakes

Woman afraid she's made a mistake. biting her nailsI’m putting myself out there and sharing some mistakes I’ve made and those I’ve seen online. I could probably share dozens of episodes on this topic alone, but let’s focus on the mistakes I’ve seen people make online and what my experience has taught me to do differently in my business.

I’m so glad you’re here so you can listen and discern what is best for your business.

The First Hiring Mistake is Ignoring your gut!

STAY WITH ME – As HR, I know that is the last thing I should say, BUT

  • I’ve heard too many HR people, myself included, tell their hiring managers to ignore their gut, when in reality, your brain is wired to process both logic AND emotion.
  • Your “gut feeling” is the sum total of your life experiences and interactions. Each time you having a hiring or work experience, interaction, event, or whatever, your building an ‘exposure.’
  • You process how well this exposure went. So, when you gave someone a chance even though they didn’t meet all of your criteria, this is an exposure. If this happens more than once, you are building the case in your ‘gut’ that you should stick to the criteria.
  • The more exposures you have, you more you are building this gut feeling.

What I do instead: I help hiring managers temper that gut feeling with logical decision making and quantifiable knowledge, skills, and abilities.

A good HR Manager or Recruiter is always going to help you turn your gut feelings into tangible skills, values, behaviors, and capabilities, and will create mind-blowing questions and scenarios that help you decide which candidate meets those.

By transforming your gut feelings into quantifiable and measurable knowledge, skills and abilities, you will get to the heart of what you really need in a successful candidate and leave behind risks that are potentially illegal and full of stereotyping.

You don’t want to IGNORE your gut, but you need to turn what you’re describing as your gut feeling into something measurable.

The Second Hiring Mistake is to Throw Generic Recommendations On Social Media

I see it all too often. Facebook groups filled with “Hey, I’m looking for a great candidate for x,y,z position, anyone know of anyone?” And the feed is full of, “That’s me…let me DM you.”

  • I looked up a few examples right before going live here:
  • I’m looking for a phenomenal VA. (Who doesn’t think they are phenomenal?)
  • Looking for a graphic designer with exceptional graphic design skills (Really?)
  • I’m looking for a content creator with super social media skills (copy writer, content creator, image specialist, Pinterest, linked IN?)

IF you throw this out there and point people to a thorough application process that leaves no room for what you expect, what the person will do and what your ideal hire looks like, then you’re good.

But too often I see people post these recommendations and either get flooded with resumes of every possible skill and variety or none that really fit the mark.

That’s one way to find good candidates – I get it, but I’m an operations consultant, who wants you to not only find EXCELLENT and engaged employees.  There’s a whole lot more to hiring an employee than finding the right match of skills.

Here’s What I Do Instead: I create the ideal hire like I create the ideal client. I’m asking questions about values (stay legal), and specific skills, but I’m also asking questions that garner situational reactions so I can compare them to my own values.

You’re going to build a plan that includes:

  • Job Posting Content
  • Ideal Audience Defined
  • A clear Application Process
  • Screening Process that helps you MAKE YOUR DECISION
  • Interview Questions THAT MAKES YOUR DECISION EASIER
  •  Selection Formula Scripts (1 offer, 1 release, 1 non-qualified)
  • Onboarding structure

Your brand is being tested.

 

If you are offering scaling services without a way to hire with excellence, I hope you’ll reach out to me or one of the moderators

Or create a hiring structure that touches all the logical and emotional aspects of yours and your clients’ businesses.

What do you think? How much do you put into hiring a successful candidate?

The Third Hiring Mistake is The Absence of an Onboarding Plan

Your new hire is never going to be as energetic and optimistic and full of vim and vigor as they are on their first few days on the job. If you don’t have a plan that captures that and seizes the opportunity to utilize it, you’re missing out on some gifts.

Now is the time to get them excited about your mission, learning about your strategic objectives and finding out how they are going to pay for themselves. Right? Because you want them bringing in revenue. Even if they are indirect costs, everything they do should be working towards bringing you revenue or reducing your costs to improve your profits.

Have you thought about your own workload during onboarding? Let’s be real clear here – your workload will increase before it decreases, no matter how great of an onboarding plan you have.

You’ve hired your perfect candidate, what are you doing with them?

  • Do they have the passwords and log in information they need?
  • Have you figured out the pay requirements and taxes where they live?
  • How often are you going to meet with them?
  • What does their personal growth plan look like?
  • How are you measuring success?
  • What do their core hours need to be?

Tell me what your onboarding plan looks like! 

And if you’d like to sign for my free Hiring Infographic, sign up here.

And don’t forget to stop by my STEPS TO HIRING page for even more details!

We all have some horror stories to tell, join the Facebook Group, Small Business Confidants to share your story.

Thanks for listening or reading about today’s  THE ONE BURNING QUESTION podcast. If you liked this episode, be sure and like it, comment, and definitely share with your friends and colleagues.

Until next week, I’m here for you.

Let's Get to Know Each Other:
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kassfogle@gmail.com

kassfogle@gmail.com

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